iOS Mail.app toolbar redesign

via Craig Hockenberry.

I’m right there with Craig in wondering why so many common actions were removed.

And while this isn’t specific to iOS 13, it’s always puzzled me why Delete is right next to Reply – especially now on iOS 13 with so much more toolbar space available. That button placement just seems…dangerous.

Ugh, Music.app

The way to make a single song repeat in Music in iOS 13 is the absolute dumbest interaction design decision I’ve encountered in iOS in years. Clearly every designer working on iOS at Apple uses Spotify.

Via Mike Rundle; and he’s not the only one.

I consider myself an advanced user, nonetheless, Music.app on iOS baffles me nearly every time I use it. It’s just the weirdest damn thing, and I constantly find myself getting lost.

I’ve been an Apple Music subscriber since 2015, and I still have no coherent understanding of how the Up Next queue works.

Is it because I’m in my 30’s and I think everything featured on the “Browse” tab is just the 2019 equivalent of mid-90’s FM radio payola hot-garbage?

The only reason I use Apple Music over Spotify (or, hell, even Tidal) is because every time I’ve attempted to use a competing service, iOS insists on playing the first song in my iTunes library that begins with the letter A whenever I start my car.

Fingerprint Scammer

I’ve seen App Review miss tons of shady shit, but this one is particularly vile. Granted, it comes from a ten month old reddit post, so I can’t be sure exactly whether or not this trick still works with iOS 13. But that’s not the point. It did work at one point. And it got past App Review.

Just in case it’s not clear: this scammer instructs the user to place their finger on the phone’s home button so they can scan it to provide “personalized diet” recommendations. And as soon as the user does that, they prompt for a $99.99 in-app purchase, which, of course, is instantly approved because their finger is on the home button to authorize it. It’s brilliant.

So, what’s the point of App Review again? To quote Apple’s marketing page for the App Store:

Expertly curated.

We created the App Store with two goals in mind: that it be a safe and trusted place for customers to discover and download apps…

We take responsibility for ensuring that apps are held to a high standard for privacy, security, and content because nothing is more important than maintaining the trust of our users.

via @jamxf

iCloud Security Codes

None of this stuff makes sense to normal users and is, frustratingly, never explained in detail anywhere for those of us who want to understand and know more.

Could they not add a “Learn More” option? Where’s the iOS equivalent of the macOS Help button?

In the past, iOS has even prompted my to enter the password for my Mac’s local user account. Again, as a developer, I kinda get and understand what’s happening, but even I’m still slightly confused about exactly what data is protected behind my macOS password vs my iOS PIN vs my iCloud Security Code, etc.

via James Kuang